Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2018, Page: 75-82
Early Germination, Growth and Establishment of Khaya senegalensis (DESR.) A. Juss in Middle-Belt Zone of Nigeria
Zaccheus Tunde Egbewole, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria
Odunayo James Rotowa, Department of Forest Production and Products, Faculty of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Emmanuel Dauda Kuje, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria
Oluwasola Abiodun Ogundana, Department of Forestry Technology, Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan, Nigeria
Hassan Haladu Mairafi, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria
Ibrahim Yohanna, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria
Received: Jul. 18, 2018;       Accepted: Aug. 29, 2018;       Published: Nov. 19, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.jenr.20180703.11      View  59      Downloads  10
Abstract
A study was carried out to investigate the early growth and establishment of Khaya senegalensis in three different locations (Markurdi, Benue State, Lafia, Nasarawa state and Kwali, Abuja) within the middle belt zone of Nigeria in October 2014 with the aim to mass raising mahogany at economic scale. The study was carried out at the Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Ecotourism Nursery, Nasarawa State University Keffi, Shabu- Lafia Campus. The seeds were separately broadcasted on three different nursery beds and watered effectively. The parameter assessed include Plant height, Leaf count, Leave area and Collar girth. Data was analyzed using Analysis of variance and significant mean differences were separated at p>0.05. The results of parameter assessed on the basis of locations shows that seedlings from Makurdi had the highest mean height of 5.33±2.96cm at 14 weeks after transplanting, closely followed by seedling from Kwali with mean height of 5.33±2.43cm while seedling from Lafia had the least mean height of 5.29±2.46cm. The result of leave count revealed that seedling from Lafia had the highest leave count of 5.28±2.84 followed by Kwali with 5.25±3.00 while leave count of seedlings from Makurdi had the least leave count of 5.18±3.0. The result of growth variables revealed that, Khaya senegalensis saplings intercropped with cassava at Agroforestry plantation Plot had attained 2.415±0.45m average height, 11.12±3.5cm basal girth, 3.95±1.43cm dbh, leaf count of 151.37±18.84 within a period of 36months of planting on the field. The ANOVA result shows that there was significant difference in the leave count, leave length, collar girth and plant height from the three locations at p>0.05, result of correlation analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between leaf count and plant height (0.78**), collar girth and leaf count (0.67**). While the result of the regression analysis on the effects of growth variables on plant height had coefficient of R2 = 0.67, meaning that the assessed growth variables had about 67.4% effects on plant height of Khaya senegalensis seeds collected from different locations. The study reveals that seeds from different source demonstrated different growth performance, as it was observed that seeds obtained from Lafia performed better than the other two locations and as a result recommended for mass raising of Khaya senegalens within the middle-belt zone of Nigeria.
Keywords
Khaya senegalens, Collar Girth, Seedlings, Leave Count
To cite this article
Zaccheus Tunde Egbewole, Odunayo James Rotowa, Emmanuel Dauda Kuje, Oluwasola Abiodun Ogundana, Hassan Haladu Mairafi, Ibrahim Yohanna, Early Germination, Growth and Establishment of Khaya senegalensis (DESR.) A. Juss in Middle-Belt Zone of Nigeria, Journal of Energy and Natural Resources. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2018, pp. 75-82. doi: 10.11648/j.jenr.20180703.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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